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Call for Proposals: Gender & Development special issue on resilience

Photo: CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems. Source: Flickr

Photo: CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems. Source: Flickr

The November 2015 issue of the international journal Gender & Development will look at Resilience. See the full call for proposals here.

An increasing number of women and men, girls and boys are finding their lives and rights disrupted and threatened by a range of interconnected shocks and stresses caused by various and often interlocking factors such as climate change, increasing inequality, globalisation, conflict and unsustainable resource use. Between 2001 and 2010, recorded disasters alone affected, on average, 232 million people each year, in addition to the 106 million who were killed, and caused an estimated US$108 billion in economic damages. In addition, smaller and larger political, economic, environmental and social crises have put a cumulative strain on mental and physical health, lives and livelihoods, and on personal and national security. Over the past decade, resilience has become a significant new area of development, policy and humanitarian debate, and programme work is evolving in response.

Women are often assumed to be inherently more vulnerable – and hence less resilient – than men. While this may be true of some women in some contexts, a more nuanced understanding is needed. Gender inequality and gendered norms create and intensify vulnerability by constraining women’s responses to sudden shocks, and placing longer-term strain on livelihoods, stability and wellbeing. Resilience is greatly enhanced by policies which ensure women’s equal rights, and active participation and leadership in livelihoods, social protection, conflict resolution, and disaster management. This means working in partnership with women as individuals, and with feminist movements and women’s organisations. How and in what way can the concept of resilience offer support to the global struggle for women’s rights and gender equality?

This issue of Gender & Development will feature analysis of innovative resilience work in many different contexts.

Read the full announcement here.


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Five great job opportunities: ACDI/VOCA, Women for Women International, Banyan Global, & International Rescue Committee

Photo: CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems. Source: Flickr

Photo: CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems. Source: Flickr


Director of Gender Mainstreaming and Women’s Empowerment
with ACDI/VOCA

Gender and Social Empowerment Associate Director with Women for Women International 

Associate Director, Monitoring, Research, and Evaluation with Women for Women International 

Gender Specialist, Mozambique with Banyan Global

Women’s Protection and Empowerment Senior Research Manager with the International Rescue Committee 


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Publication: Transnational Land Deals and Gender Equality: Utilitarian and Human Rights Approaches

This article by Poul Wosberg, published in Feminist Economics, is freely available from Routledge Social Sciences journals until June 30, 2015: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13545701.2013.862341#.VNt2_8msyuw

Abstract:

Transnational land deals pose vexing normative (ethical) questions, not least concerning gendered participation and outcomes. This article explores utilitarian and human rights approaches to gender equality in selected policy initiatives on the land deals. While global policy literature manifests growing attention to women in agriculture, the review found the analysis of gender in early policy initiatives to be absent or weak. Utilitarian arguments were used to justify deals but rarely presented women’s participation as a means of social progress or so-called smart economics. Human rights documents were more likely to be critical of the deals and to mention gender, though with little elaboration. While to some extent amended by the emphasis on gender equality in the 2012 Voluntary Guidelines on tenure governance, failures to mobilize the feminist potential in utilitarian and human rights approaches call for more proactive gender analysis and advocacy when addressing transnational land deals as gendered power struggles.

Other key publications from Routledge Social Sciences journals can be accessed here.


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Brief: Gender and Food Security – Towards gender-just food and nutrition security

This BRIDGE Cutting Edge Overview Report makes the case for a new, gender-aware understanding of food security, arguing that partial, apolitical and gender-blind diagnoses of the problem of food and nutrition insecurity is leading to insufficient policy responses and the failure to realise the right to food for all people. Showcasing effective and promising existing strategies, the report suggests that in order to truly achieve food security for all in gender equitable ways, responses need to be rights-based, gender-just and environmentally sustainable.

The report is the result of a collaborative and participatory process, involving over 40 experts on food and nutrition security and gender from around the world.

Available here.


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Publication: Gender-specific Approaches, Rural Institutions and Technological Innovations

A new publication from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), and the Global Forum on Agricultural Research (GFAR), is available, titled: Gender-specific Approaches, Rural Institutions and Technological Innovations: Identifying Demand- and Supply-Side Constraints and Opportunities in Access, Adoption, and Impact of Agricultural Technological Innovations.

Authors: Catherine Ragasa and Debdatta Sengupta from IFPRI, and Martha Osorio, Nora Ourabah Haddad, and Kirsten Mathieson from FAO

Abstract:

This paper reviews and integrates findings from existing empirical studies and case studies received from 35 organizations in various countries to identify demand- and supply-side constraints and opportunities in access, adoption and impact of agricultural technological innovations. The most common technologies studied are improved seeds, fertilizers, farm mechanization, improved management practices, transporting technologies, and information and communication technologies. This review consistently finds that women have much lower observed rates of adoption of a wide range of technologies than men; and these are mainly due to differentiated access to complementary inputs and services. There are limited studies that looked at upstream stages including priority-setting and innovation processes, in which women continue to be underrepresented. Over the years, the development community and local organizations have been actively working and finding solutions to improve tools and approaches to bring technological innovations closer to poor women and men farmers and making sure that they are involved from the research priority-setting and technology development. There are a number of supply- and demand-side opportunities and promising pilots, and are synthesized in this paper.


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Event: Beijing+20: Gender, Power, and Decision-Making

The Gender and Inclusive Development Workgroup Presents:

Beijing+20: Gender, Power and Decision-MakingTuesday, February 24, 2015
12:30 – 2:00 PM
National Democratic Institute
455 Massachusetts Ave NW, 8th Floor
Washington, DCOn February 24, the SID GID Beijing+20 discussion series continues with a conversation on Point G: “Women in Power and Decision-Making,” co-hosted with the National Democratic Institute and the International Foundation for Electoral Systems. The discussion will begin with an exploration of progress made since 1995 toward women’s equal and active participation in power structures and decision-making, as well as their capacity to participate in decision-making and leadership.

Panelists will comment on the best practices that have evolved and moved women forward in the political sphere since 1995, as well as on emerging issues and future opportunities. The frameworks of international development work are shifting and being reshaped; these frameworks, like the Sustainable Development Goals, offer new opportunities for women in politics. The panel will explore how current and proven strategies can be built upon and carried forward, and how a more integrated, inclusive approach to democracy development might provide greater opportunity to achieving sustainable development overall.

Continue reading


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Event: Introducing the Violence Against Women Self-Assessment Tool: Reflections on Facilitating Reflectiveness

Activists and programmers in the global movement to end violence against women (VAW) are brave, motivated, and ever-innovating, but remain far from the finish line. Often, for good reason, they are caught up in the urgency of mobilizing communities against violence and providing survivors the support they need. Opportunities to reflect on the design of their projects, to learn from the experiences of other innovators, and to set goals for their own growth are rare.

ICRW’s newly-published “Violence Against Women Self-Assessment Tool” aims to be that much-needed pause, deep breath, and moment of reflection for these tireless organizations. If used thoughtfully, this tool can provide a clear overview of the strengths and areas for growth in VAW interventions, helping programmers to envision program improvements and to prioritize their organizational learning goals.

Join us on Tuesday, February 24th for a lunchtime launch event for this new product at ICRW’s DC headquarters. In addition to introducing the print and online versions of the Self-Assessment Tool, ICRW staff will model the same reflectiveness the tool aims to prompt by openly sharing the ups and downs of writing, testing, revising, and disseminating this new product.

To learn more and to see the tool, visit http://www.icrw.org/vaw

A light lunch will be served. Please RSVP to Sara Ku at sku@icrw.org

When:

Tue, 02/24/2015 – 12:00pm1:00pm

Where:
ICRW’s DC Headquarters

1120 20th Street NW Suite 500 North

Washington, DC 20036

United States
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