Launch of UN Women flagship report, Progress of the World’s Women 2015-2016: Transforming Economies, Realizing Rights

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The World Bank Group Gender Group and UN Women invite you to

UN Women’s Progress of the World’s Women 2015-2016

 Thursday, October 1, 2015

Room MC 4-800, 1818 H St NW

1:00-2:30PM


RSVP Here

This event will be livestreamed here

Please join the WBG Gender Group at the Washington DC launch of UN Women’s flagship report, Progress of the World’s Women 2015-2016: Transforming Economies, Realizing Rights. This report draws on promising experiences from around the world, proposing a comprehensive agenda for key policy actors-including gender equality advocates, national governments, and international agencies-to make human rights a lived reality for all women and girls. A frequent WBG partner on a range of issues, UN Women has released this report at a pivotal moment for global development, 20 years after the landmark Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing and ahead of the adoption of new global Sustainable Development Goals.

Progress of the World’s Women finds that despite some significant advances toward gender equality, persistent gaps between males and females remain-hindering efforts to end poverty and preventing individuals and economies alike from achieving their full potential. Embedded in a framework of substantive equality, the report focuses on three interrelated challenges: transforming paid and unpaid work for women’s rights; making social policy work for women; and creating an enabling macroeconomic environment.

Chair:

Caren Grown, Senior Director, Gender Cross-Cutting Solutions Area, The World Bank Group

Speakers:

Shahrashoub Razavi, Chief, Research and Data, UN Women

James Heintz, Andrew Glyn Professor of Economics, Associate Director of Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts, Amhurst


Discussant:

Samuel Otoo, Economic Adviser, Macroeconomics and Fiscal Management Global Practice, The World Bank Group

Caren Grown, Senior Director, Gender CCSA, is an internationally recognized expert on gender issues in development. Prior to joining the Bank, she was Economist-In-Residence and co-director of the Program on Gender Analysis in Economics at American University (AU) in Washington, DC. In 2013-2014, she led the UNU-WIDER program on aid effectiveness and gender equality. During 2011-2013 she served as Senior Gender Advisor and Acting Senior Coordinator for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment at the US Agency for International Development (USAID), where she crafted the Agency’s Gender Equality and Female Empowerment policy and led efforts to implement it in systems and programs.

Shahra Razavim is the Chief of the Research & Data Section at UN Women. Her research and publications have been on gender dimensions of development, with a focus on agrarian issues, social policy and the care economy. Since January 2013 when she joined UN Women, Shahra has overseen the research on two of UN Women’s flagship reports, Progress of the World’s Women 2015-2016 (Transforming the Economy, Realizing Rights) and the World Survey on the Role of Women in Development 2014 (Gender Equality and Sustainable Development).   Before joining UN Women, Shahra was a senior researcher at the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD) in Geneva. Her recent publications include Seen, Heard and Counted: Rethinking Care in a Development Context (special issue of Development and Change, 2011) and Gendered Impacts of Liberalization (Routledge, 2009). Shahra grew up in Iran, and obtained her Bachelors from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and her Masters and PhD (D.Phil.) from Oxford University.

James Heintz is Andrew Glyn Professor of Economics and Associate Director of the Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  His current work focuses on employment policy; economics and human rights; informal and atypical employment; macroeconomic policies for sub-Saharan Africa; and the links between economic policies and distributive outcomes, including race and gender dimensions.

Samuel Otoo is Economic Adviser in the Macroeconomics and Fiscal Management Global Practice. A macro-economist by training, Samuel has extensive and diverse leadership experience with economic policy, public sector management and capacity development issues in Africa, Central Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America, South Asia and the Pacific. He has held managerial and senior technical positions across the operational and knowledge complexes of the World Bank, including Sector Manager for Economic Policy in the World Bank’s Europe and Central Asia Regional Office, and Manager of the Global Governance Programs and Capacity Development and Results units of the World Bank Institute.

A light lunch will be provided.

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