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Call for abstracts/Learning Labs for the Agriculture, Nutrition, and Health Academy Week

The Agriculture, Nutrition & Health (ANH) Academy invites the global community of ANH researchers and users of this research to the first ANH Academy Week to be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on 20-24 June 2016.

The ANH Academy Week will be an annual event, expanding on the successful history of the five Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture and Health (LCIRAH) conferences and events and activities by CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) and Innovative Methods and Metrics for Agriculture and Nutrition Action (IMMANA).

The goal of the ANH Academy Week is to facilitate learning and sharing among the global community of interdisciplinary researchers and research-users working on agriculture and food systems for improved nutrition and health. The first ANH Academy Week is to be held in Addis Ababa to facilitate participation and engagement of the African research and research-user communities with participants from around the world.

The ANH Academy Week programme will feature contributions from a diverse set of ANH Academy partners and with the oversight of an International Steering Committee, including:
1) Conference on Agri-Health Research. The call for abstracts is now open, with deadline extended to March 13. 
2)  Learning Labs (training workshops) offered by ANH Academy partners
3) Events led by ANH Academy partner organisations
4) Opportunities for networking

More about the ANH Academy Week


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Call for papers: Migration, gender and agrarian change in the Global South

The International Water Management Institute has published a call for papers for a panel session on Migration, gender and agrarian change in the Global South” at the Royal Geographical Society (RGS) conference from August 31st to September 2nd in London.

Abstract:

There are an estimated 214 million international labour migrants and 740 million internal labour migrants worldwide. The impact of migration on receiving countries and regions has received unprecedented public and policy interest in recent years. However, migration also has a far reaching impact on rural economies and the trajectory of change in agriculture within the Global South. Understanding the relationship between migration and agrarian change is a classic ‘nexus’ challenge. The out-migration of men and youth in particular, can result in transformations in gender relations in agriculture, changes in how natural resources are managed, new patterns of investment, and reconfigured power relations and geographies of inequality. However, the character of these agrarian transformations over time and place are mediated by larger scale processes such as climate change and regional or global political economy – the same processes which drive migration in the first place.
This event will bring together case study research on migration and rural change in the Global South to generate dialogue and debate on rural transformation in migrant sending regions and countries, to identify a research and policy agenda.

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Open Call for agency-level advising services candidates: agency-level advising provided by INGENAES

Is your organization doing work in Zambia? The Integrating Nutrition and Gender within Agricultural Extension Services (INGENAES) project intends to help you to address the unique challenges specific to your organization and context – through confidential advising assistance targeted specifically to your organization. Click here for the full background and advising activity description. 

To apply to receive INGENAES advising services for projects in Zambia, please complete this survey by September 30.  If you have questions about the program please address them to Nikki Grey Rutamu at ngreyrutamu@ucdavis.edu


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Call for Posters on Conference on Nutrition, Health, and Gender in Sub-Saharan Africa

gender nutrition conference


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Call for articles: Women and agroecology (Farming Matters)

Deadline: 1 September 2015

Women are strong drivers of agroecological change in farming and consumer communities. One example is the women’s movement for agrobiodiverse, pesticide-free crop production in India. In other places, women experiment with intercropping, vegetable box schemes and seed exchanges. What motivates them? And what role does agroecology play in improving the lives of women?

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Call for abstracts for special journal issue on how gender interacts with policies, institutions, and/or markets

The Journal of Gender, Agriculture, and Food Security and the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM) invite you to submit papers for a special issue focused on how gender interacts with policies, institutions, and/or markets in the areas of agriculture and food security.  Extended abstracts are due by April 4, 2015.

We also invite those submitting abstracts to participate in a one-day write-shop on July 14, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Participants will present their paper and receive feedback on it from experts in the field.

You can find further information at this link and in the call for papers: Agrigender and PIM writeshop. Please share this call with colleagues within the CGIAR as well as with external partners.


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Call for Proposals: Gender & Development special issue on resilience

Photo: CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems. Source: Flickr

Photo: CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems. Source: Flickr

The November 2015 issue of the international journal Gender & Development will look at Resilience. See the full call for proposals here.

An increasing number of women and men, girls and boys are finding their lives and rights disrupted and threatened by a range of interconnected shocks and stresses caused by various and often interlocking factors such as climate change, increasing inequality, globalisation, conflict and unsustainable resource use. Between 2001 and 2010, recorded disasters alone affected, on average, 232 million people each year, in addition to the 106 million who were killed, and caused an estimated US$108 billion in economic damages. In addition, smaller and larger political, economic, environmental and social crises have put a cumulative strain on mental and physical health, lives and livelihoods, and on personal and national security. Over the past decade, resilience has become a significant new area of development, policy and humanitarian debate, and programme work is evolving in response.

Women are often assumed to be inherently more vulnerable – and hence less resilient – than men. While this may be true of some women in some contexts, a more nuanced understanding is needed. Gender inequality and gendered norms create and intensify vulnerability by constraining women’s responses to sudden shocks, and placing longer-term strain on livelihoods, stability and wellbeing. Resilience is greatly enhanced by policies which ensure women’s equal rights, and active participation and leadership in livelihoods, social protection, conflict resolution, and disaster management. This means working in partnership with women as individuals, and with feminist movements and women’s organisations. How and in what way can the concept of resilience offer support to the global struggle for women’s rights and gender equality?

This issue of Gender & Development will feature analysis of innovative resilience work in many different contexts.

Read the full announcement here.

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