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Gender in Agriculture Partnership Special Issue: Gender in GCARD3

The Gender in Agriculture Partnership (GAP) has released a Special Issue of the GAP Newsletter on the occasion of the third Global Conference on Agricultural Research for Development (GCARD3), Johannesburg, 5-8 April 2016, considering the question, Why are Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment critical to strengthen Agriculture-Nutrition Linkages? Read the newsletter here.

 


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Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Small-Scale Irrigation: Technical Workshops on gender and irrigation

Reposted from the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Small-Scale Irrigation (ILSSI) website.

Upcoming workshops in Ghana (April 13-14) and Tanzania (April 20-21) will carry forward this dialogue and forge new networks of government agents and practitioners working at the interface of gender and irrigation. If you work in these countries and would like more information about these workshops, please contact Sophie Theis from IFPRI.

IWMI ethiopia photo

On March 9-10, 2016, the first in a series of Feed the Future ILSSI workshops to strengthen capacity on gender and water was held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (agenda, pdf), convened by the International Food Policy Research Institute, the International Water Management Institute, and the Ethiopian Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Over 45 participants from the Ethiopian government, NGOs, and research institutes joined for two days of interactive presentations, trainings, and discussion on gender issues in agricultural water management. Workshop materials, including presentations and videos, can be accessed here (Day 1 and Day 2).

The workshop series was motivated by the fact that control over water is essential for productive agriculture, but we have limited knowledge about whether women’s water needs are being met. ILSSI is addressing this knowledge gap, through research and capacity building-for-development in Ethiopia, Tanzania and Ghana to identify the technological, economic, and cultural factors limiting women’s ability to irrigate.

 

The workshop involved presentations from the Women’s Affairs Directorate in the Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the Agricultural Transformation Agency, and IFPRI describing the state of knowledge on women’s access to water and the benefits of gender equality in water. A dozen NGOs and researchers shared case studies on their work overcoming barriers to women’s access to water. Presenters pointed out that women do have distinct needs that are not being met, and a one-size-fits all irrigation promotion policy is insufficient to achieve national gender equality, food security, and climate resilience goals. (Photo Credits: Apollo Habtamu/IWMI )

Building on early findings from qualitative and quantitative research in Ethiopia, Ghana, and Tanzania, the ILSSI team is developing a diagnostic checklist that water-related interventions can draw on to identify the key factors limiting women’s control over water. This instrument is being further refined through these workshops.

In the Ethiopia workshop, participants practiced using the checklist to apply gender concepts to the case study discussions. Participants expressed interest in using the checklist to promote dialogue with communities about solutions to gendered water needs and proposed using the checklist to inform Ministry of Agriculture gender mainstreaming guidelines.

 


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Event, March 22: Strengthening women’s participation in fisheries management: Lessons from Ghana

ghana fisheries.png

Remote access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/997685717


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New grant equips researchers to advance gender-responsive agricultural research in sub-Saharan Africa

GREAT Pilot Course_low resolution

GREAT (Gender-responsive Researchers Equipped for Agricultural Transformation) is a new project that will equip researchers to create more inclusive and effective agricultural systems by addressing the priorities of both women and men in sub-Saharan Africa.

 

 Achieving greater parity among women and men in sub-Saharan Africa so they more equally share the benefits of agricultural research is the goal of an initiative announced today, on International Women’s Day, in the spirit of the Pledge for Parity campaign.

The $5M grant to equip researchers to create more inclusive and effective agricultural systems by addressing the priorities of both women and men in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has been awarded to Cornell University, in partnership with Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Gender-responsive Researchers Equipped for Agricultural Transformation, or GREAT, will deliver training to agricultural researchers from SSA in the theory and practice of gender-responsive research in the key areas of root, tuber, and banana breeding; grain and legume breeding; small ruminant breeding; dairy and legume value chains; nutrition and food systems; knowledge exchange (extension); and agricultural mechanization.

“Women play critical roles in food production and processing, but their input is frequently overlooked by agricultural researchers,” said Hale Ann Tufan, gender specialist and adjunct professor with International Programs in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, who will lead the project for Cornell. “Gender-blind research projects and products inadvertently increase the burden on women and limit the potential positive impact of research outputs.”

“GREAT will increase opportunities for equitable participation and the sharing of benefits from agricultural research and improve the outcomes for smallholder women farmers, entrepreneurs, and farmer organizations across sub-Saharan Africa,” said Margaret Mangheni, associate professor at Makerere University who has over 20 years of experience with gender-sensitive agricultural development projects in Uganda and across Africa. Mangheni will lead the project at Makerere.

GREAT will train researchers to address the priorities of both women and men when setting project goals, implementing projects, and measuring and communicating project outcomes.

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IFPRI Gender Methods Seminar: Good practices and lessons learned on gender and collective lands

Resource Equity with Landesa

Presentation by Elisa Scalise and Renee Giovarelli, Co-founders of Resource Equity

Chair: Agnes Quisumbing, Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI Poverty, Health, and Nutrition Division

Discussant: Ruth Meinzen-Dick, Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI Environment and Production Technology Division

Monday, March 14, 2016, 12:00pm-1:00pm

Please find instructions for joining virtually at the end of this message.

Synopsis of the presentation:

Global awareness of two land tenure issues–the importance of recognizing and promoting land rights for women and the problem of insecure collective land and resource tenure rights–is rising. The importance of managing collectively held land, both for those who use it and for the environment, has grown increasingly clear. In fact, studies have estimated that as much as 65 percent of the world’s land is held under collective tenure—customary, community-based tenure systems. Securing that tenure is important for protecting the rights of those communities, and has been shown to improve resource management.

However, efforts to secure community land tenure, generally through documenting and registering rights, are still new. In particular, to date, the conversation around securing collective rights to land has paid little attention to women’s rights, and the effects of formalizing the rights of the collective on women are not well studied. Focusing on securing collective land and resource rights without considering gender differences within communities has the potential to severely disadvantage women who are very often socially, economically, and politically excluded.

This report on gender issues and best practices in collective land tenure projects seeks to begin filling this gap, by taking a detailed look at how six collective tenure land projects addressed gender differences. The six case studies include projects in China, Ghana, India, Kyrgyzstan, Namibia, and Peru. The case studies are program assessments focusing primarily on how each project approached gender, what the gender-differentiated impacts have been in terms of project participation and benefits, and what lessons can be learned and best practices can be drawn from these projects.

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Small-Scale Women Farmers Lead the Way: The Female Food Hero Initiative, A brown-bag lunch event featuring Nigerian Female Food Hero, Monica Maigari

Thursday 10 March 2016, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm EST (-5 GMT), at the Oxfam America DC office, Capitol Conference Room,1101 17th St NW #1300, Washington, DC 20036, or online (instructions below). 

Lunch will be provided to those attending. Please RSVP to Jim French, jfrench@oxfamamcerica.org

To participate in the program online:

Meeting Link: https://nethope.webex.com/nethope/j.php?MTID=md2c233758a611fed1d26e9f21cf09533

Audio connection: 1-866-3864210 (US) Call-in toll-free number / 1-443-8636601 (US) Call-in number / View global numbers

Conference Code: 975 113 4594

Meeting number: 827 907 852


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Call for abstracts/Learning Labs for the Agriculture, Nutrition, and Health Academy Week

The Agriculture, Nutrition & Health (ANH) Academy invites the global community of ANH researchers and users of this research to the first ANH Academy Week to be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on 20-24 June 2016.

The ANH Academy Week will be an annual event, expanding on the successful history of the five Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture and Health (LCIRAH) conferences and events and activities by CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) and Innovative Methods and Metrics for Agriculture and Nutrition Action (IMMANA).

The goal of the ANH Academy Week is to facilitate learning and sharing among the global community of interdisciplinary researchers and research-users working on agriculture and food systems for improved nutrition and health. The first ANH Academy Week is to be held in Addis Ababa to facilitate participation and engagement of the African research and research-user communities with participants from around the world.

The ANH Academy Week programme will feature contributions from a diverse set of ANH Academy partners and with the oversight of an International Steering Committee, including:
1) Conference on Agri-Health Research. The call for abstracts is now open, with deadline extended to March 13. 
2)  Learning Labs (training workshops) offered by ANH Academy partners
3) Events led by ANH Academy partner organisations
4) Opportunities for networking

More about the ANH Academy Week