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Gender in Agriculture Partnership Special Issue: Gender in GCARD3

The Gender in Agriculture Partnership (GAP) has released a Special Issue of the GAP Newsletter on the occasion of the third Global Conference on Agricultural Research for Development (GCARD3), Johannesburg, 5-8 April 2016, considering the question, Why are Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment critical to strengthen Agriculture-Nutrition Linkages? Read the newsletter here.

 


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Gender project officer with Tanzania Natural Resource Forum

Click here to read the full Terms of Reference. The deadline to apply is April 11th.

With global attention focused on inequitable land-related investments, governments, donors, civil society, and the private sector have come together to improve land governance and investment practices. The African Union’s Guiding Principles on Large Scale Land Based Investments, the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (VGGT), and other standards and principles are emblematic of the international community’s commitment to improving policy and practice leading to socially responsible land-related investments.
The Responsible Investments in Property and Land (RIPL) project contributes to these on-going global efforts by supporting the participation and empowerment of communities, governments, and investors in such investments. Significantly, RIPL is committed to facilitating gender-equitable investments in land to ensure that women and men are not harmed by such investments and that women and men share equally in the benefits of investments.
The primary output of the RIPL project, in partnership with local land tenure experts, is the development of how-to guides, called “Playbooks,” for each stakeholder group (one for communities, one for investors, and one for government). The Playbooks will be developed in two focus countries—Tanzania and Ghana. These country-specific Playbooks will, in turn, inform the development of Model Playbooks that can be used as templates in other countries.


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Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Small-Scale Irrigation: Technical Workshops on gender and irrigation

Reposted from the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Small-Scale Irrigation (ILSSI) website.

Upcoming workshops in Ghana (April 13-14) and Tanzania (April 20-21) will carry forward this dialogue and forge new networks of government agents and practitioners working at the interface of gender and irrigation. If you work in these countries and would like more information about these workshops, please contact Sophie Theis from IFPRI.

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On March 9-10, 2016, the first in a series of Feed the Future ILSSI workshops to strengthen capacity on gender and water was held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (agenda, pdf), convened by the International Food Policy Research Institute, the International Water Management Institute, and the Ethiopian Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Over 45 participants from the Ethiopian government, NGOs, and research institutes joined for two days of interactive presentations, trainings, and discussion on gender issues in agricultural water management. Workshop materials, including presentations and videos, can be accessed here (Day 1 and Day 2).

The workshop series was motivated by the fact that control over water is essential for productive agriculture, but we have limited knowledge about whether women’s water needs are being met. ILSSI is addressing this knowledge gap, through research and capacity building-for-development in Ethiopia, Tanzania and Ghana to identify the technological, economic, and cultural factors limiting women’s ability to irrigate.

 

The workshop involved presentations from the Women’s Affairs Directorate in the Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the Agricultural Transformation Agency, and IFPRI describing the state of knowledge on women’s access to water and the benefits of gender equality in water. A dozen NGOs and researchers shared case studies on their work overcoming barriers to women’s access to water. Presenters pointed out that women do have distinct needs that are not being met, and a one-size-fits all irrigation promotion policy is insufficient to achieve national gender equality, food security, and climate resilience goals. (Photo Credits: Apollo Habtamu/IWMI )

Building on early findings from qualitative and quantitative research in Ethiopia, Ghana, and Tanzania, the ILSSI team is developing a diagnostic checklist that water-related interventions can draw on to identify the key factors limiting women’s control over water. This instrument is being further refined through these workshops.

In the Ethiopia workshop, participants practiced using the checklist to apply gender concepts to the case study discussions. Participants expressed interest in using the checklist to promote dialogue with communities about solutions to gendered water needs and proposed using the checklist to inform Ministry of Agriculture gender mainstreaming guidelines.

 


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Visiting researcher position: CGIAR Gender and Agriculture Research Network Communications support

The visiting researcher will support the Communications and Knowledge Management Coordinator for the Gender Network and be responsible for generating, editing and curating content and special features, including social media for the gender network’s website and related online channels, with the aim of increasing the sites’ effectiveness in attracting and engaging with target audiences such as network members and donors.

Please send a cover letter, curriculum vitae or resume (less than 2 pages), and names and email addresses of three referees knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience.

All correspondence should be addressed to Martina Mascarenhas (m.mascarenhas@cgiar.org) and must include “Visiting Researcher: CGIAR Gender and Agriculture Research network Communications” in the subject line.

Applications received after 30 April 2016 will not be considered. To learn more about the CGIAR Gender and Agriculture Research Network visit: gender.cgiar.org.


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Event, March 22: Strengthening women’s participation in fisheries management: Lessons from Ghana

ghana fisheries.png

Remote access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/997685717


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Center for Global Development seeking consultants for An Update to A Roadmap for Promoting Women’s Economic Empowerment

The Center for Global Development (CGD) is conducting a systematic review of the most recent evidence since A Roadmap for Promoting Women’s Economic Empowerment was produced by the United Nations Foundation with support from the ExxonMobil Foundation in September 2013. A partial update was published in The World Bank Research Observer in 2014. This project, which will serve as a collaboration between CGD, the United Nations Foundation (UNF), and the ExxonMobil Foundation, will identify potential new interventions that increase women’s productivity and earnings in developing country contexts. Please see the request for proposals and terms of reference for this project:


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Gettin’ GIF-fy With It: Using the WEAI and GIF to Mainstream Gender in Your Work

Have you heard of the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (more commonly referred to as the WEAI)? I’m sure many of you have not only heard of it, but have used it in your work: In 2015 alone, 13 Feed the Future partners used WEAI data to inform programming, and to date, close to 40 organizations worldwide are using the WEAI, increasing the evidence-base on constraints women and men face in the agriculture sector. Some of you may also be familiar with the Gender Integration Framework, or GIF—a useful tool for integrating gender into project design and implementation.

What you might not know is just how to use the WEAI and GIF together. What is the relationship between the two, and how can both tools be used to promote gender mainstreaming? How does their use help us work toward our objectives of increased agricultural productivity and improved nutritional outcomes?

Head over to Agrilinks to read their takeaways from a recent WEAI and GIF training.