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Call for abstracts/Learning Labs for the Agriculture, Nutrition, and Health Academy Week

The Agriculture, Nutrition & Health (ANH) Academy invites the global community of ANH researchers and users of this research to the first ANH Academy Week to be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on 20-24 June 2016.

The ANH Academy Week will be an annual event, expanding on the successful history of the five Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture and Health (LCIRAH) conferences and events and activities by CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) and Innovative Methods and Metrics for Agriculture and Nutrition Action (IMMANA).

The goal of the ANH Academy Week is to facilitate learning and sharing among the global community of interdisciplinary researchers and research-users working on agriculture and food systems for improved nutrition and health. The first ANH Academy Week is to be held in Addis Ababa to facilitate participation and engagement of the African research and research-user communities with participants from around the world.

The ANH Academy Week programme will feature contributions from a diverse set of ANH Academy partners and with the oversight of an International Steering Committee, including:
1) Conference on Agri-Health Research. The call for abstracts is now open, with deadline extended to March 13. 
2)  Learning Labs (training workshops) offered by ANH Academy partners
3) Events led by ANH Academy partner organisations
4) Opportunities for networking

More about the ANH Academy Week

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How Women Can Maximize the Nutrition and Health Benefits of Irrigation for All

In a new A4NH Gender-Nutrition Idea Exchange post, Elizabeth Bryan builds on the agriculture-nutrition framework to examine the gendered pathways through which small-scale irrigation can affect nutrition and health outcomes. Read the blogpost here

Also, in case you missed it: In response to increasing interest in how health has bearings on the gender-agriculture-nutrition framework, A4NH organized a seminar on Agriculture, Gender, and Health: Tracing the Links on October 20, 2015. The seminar provided three case studies in how gender dynamics in rural livelihoods influence health, and in turn, nutrition. The presentations are available in the following links:


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A4NH/IFPRI Gender Seminar: Gender, Agriculture, and Health: Tracing the Links

UPDATE: Recording of the screencast and presentations are now available on Slideshare.

The CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) and the IFPRI Gender Task Force invite you to:

Gender, Agriculture, and Health: Tracing the Links

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Three 15-minute presentations from:

Kelly Jones on livelihood shocks and sexual health

Research Fellow, Markets, Trade, and Institutions Division, IFPRI

Elizabeth Bryan on irrigation, gender, and health

Senior Research Analyst, Environment Production and Technology Division, IFPRI

Delia Grace on gender-sensitive participatory risk assessment for food safety

Program Manager, Food Safety and Zoonoses, ILRI and A4NH

Chair: Hazel Malapit

Research Coordinator, A4NH and IFPRI Poverty, Health, Nutrition Division

October 20, 2015

9:30am-10:30am

IFPRI Conference Room 6A

Please find instructions for joining virtually at the end of this message.

How can we take into account health in our agriculture, nutrition, and gender research? Health and nutrition are closely interrelated: health status influences nutritional outcomes, by mediating a person’s ability to utilize nutrients and lead a healthy life, and nutritional status influences health, by mediating a person’s vulnerability to various illnesses. Both health and nutrition are directly and indirectly affected by rural livelihood decisions related to agriculture, livestock, and water management. Livelihood decisions and duties are gendered, in that social identity influences an individual’s options and choices. Men and women’s exposure to health risks, capacity to provide health care, and access to health services often vary due to these differing roles and rights.

This seminar provides three case studies in how gender dynamics in rural livelihoods influence health, and in turn, nutrition. Intended as an introduction to topics in gender, health, and agriculture, the seminar will help researchers familiar with the agriculture-to-nutrition pathways begin to think about how health has bearings on this framework.

In the seminar, Kelly Jones will present on recent research that traces how livelihood shocks may increase HIV transmission through higher-risk sex, especially for women. Elizabeth Bryan will share early-stage research on the links between small-scale irrigation adoption, gender, and health and nutrition outcomes. Delia Grace will introduce a gender-sensitive participatory risk assessment framework for addressing food safety.

We hope you can join this special Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) and the IFPRI Gender Task Force seminar in person at IFPRI or online via GoToMeeting (instructions below).

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Publication: “Focus on Families and Culture: A guide for conducting a participatory assessment on maternal and child nutrition”

For many years Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) programs have focused on women of reproductive age (WRA) given that they and their young offspring are the primary risk groups. This choice has also been influenced by the idea that WRA act independently regarding MCHN practices.

In the past few years, programs have increasingly involved men based on the assumption that they play a leading role in MCHN at the family level. This may be true in the Western world, but it may not always be true in non-Western collectivist cultures where women are part of extended and hierarchically structured families in which various actors, in addition to husbands, influence women’s thinking and behavior.

This guide from the Grandmother Project is a state-of-the-art, user-friendly guide for program managers and planners for conducting a MCHN assessment to investigate intra-household roles and influence.  The FFC guide introduces a holistic, or systemic, framework that can assist program staff to more effectively identify key priority groups for interventions.  After learning about the development and key concepts and the methodology, one is taken step by step through the assessment process, complete with case examples, sample tools and diagrams.

Download the guide here.


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Publication: Can conditional cash transfers improve maternal health and birth outcomes?

Evidence from El Salvador’s Comunidades Solidarias Rurales
Although conditional cash transfers (CCTs) are traditionally evaluated in relation to child schooling and nutrition outcomes, there is growing interest in specifically examining maternal and reproductive health impacts. However, since data collection is not typically designed to evaluate these outcomes and sample sizes are often limited, there is a lack of rigorous evidence as to whether and through which pathways these effects may be realized. This paper uses regression discontinuity design and a unique implicit threshold to evaluate the impact of El Salvador’s CCT program Comunidades Solidarias Rurales on a range of maternal and reproductive health outcomes: (1) prenatal care, (2) skilled attendance at birth, (3) birth in a health facility, and (4) postnatal care, using data collected by the International Food Policy Research Institute and its collaborators from women who entered the program in 2006 and 2007. Results indicate that robust impacts are found on outcomes at time of birth (skilled attendance and birth in facility), while no impacts are found on healthseeking behavior pre- and postbirth (prenatal and postnatal care). Potential impact pathways as well as the implications of these findings for program design are discussed in the conclusion.
Author:  de Brauw, Alan Peterman, Amber
Publisher: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)


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Publication: IFPRI 2020 Brief on ‘Gender: A key dimension linking agricultural programs to improved nutrition and health’

Improving the livelihoods and well-being of the rural poor is an important aim of agricultural development, promoted through agricultural intensification and commercialization strategies. But improved agricultural productivity does not necessarily translate into improved health and nutrition, either for producers or consumers. How can standard agricultural development strategies—promoting agricultural intensification, greater linkages to markets, and high-value production—also create positive impacts on health and nutrition? This brief argues that a key element linking these programs to improved outcomes is the dimension of gender roles and gender equity.

Access it here

 


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Publication: “Supply Shocks and Gender Bias in Child Health Investments: Evidence from the ICDS Programme in India,”

Chakravarty, Abhishek (2010) The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy: Vol. 10 : Iss. 1 (Topics), Article 88.

This paper examines whether a permanent increase in the supply of immunisations reduces or intensifies the gender bias in immunisation against female children in India. It also investigates the effect of duration of exposure to the supply shock on gender bias. The variation in the implementation of the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) programme across both regions and time is exploited for the analysis. Estimations use data from the 2005-06 Measure DHS survey in India. We find that the increased supply of vaccinations due to the programme initially increases the gender inequality in immunisation but that this increase disappears over time. Our results indicate that the programme has saved approximately 1.72-1.84 million children, of which about 70% are boys.

Available at: http://www.bepress.com/bejeap/vol10/iss1/art88