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BLOG: We don’t know how many women own land. Why?

by Cheryl Doss, Yale University
Tuesday, 17 May 2016 16:00 GMT

We know women’s legal rights to own, inherit and farm land are crucial. So why is it still so hard to know how many women have rights? The importance of women’s rights to land and property are increasingly being recognized – both as human rights and as fundamental building blocks for economic development.

However the promotion of women’s access to land is hampered by the fact that there are no systematically collected data on women’s land rights or access to land.

This gap in understanding was highlighted during construction of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which call for indicators of women’s secure land tenure and women’s legal rights to land.

Better data would not only be valuable to clarify the extent of gender inequality in land holdings but also to help lay to rest the widely used but unsubstantiated claim that women own only one or two percent of the world’s land.

Better data can also support the monitoring of programs and policies designed to strengthen women’s rights to property and help to ensure that policies without a gender focus do not, in fact, end up weakening or violating women’s property rights.

So what data is needed and how can we obtain it?

Read the rest of the post on Thomson Reuters Foundation News.

 

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EMPLOYMENT: Gender Land Tenure Specialist (Landesa)

Gender Land Tenure Specialist (Mid Level)

Position Title:            Gender Land Tenure Specialist (Mid Level)

Status:                        Regular, Full Time

Location:                    Seattle or Washington DC

Classification:           Exempt (Not Eligible for Overtime Pay)

Date:                           May 2016

Job Summary:  Within a variety of country contexts, the Gender and Land Tenure Specialist provides policy, analytical and program implementation expertise on women’s land rights, including access to property and inheritance, rural land tenure security, access to land, land rights formalization, land markets, land administration and management, and resolution of land and related disputes with a focus on impacts on women and their families. The Specialist will provide technical inputs related to women’s rights and gender; support integrating gender expertise across programs and projects; and participate in global advocacy efforts around women’s land rights, including linking land rights to other human rights and related fields such as gender-based violence, health, food security, agricultural productivity and natural resource management, and climate change.

The Specialist conducts gender-based analyses (both from the desk and in the field), drafts research and briefing papers, advisory memos, training modules, presentations, advocacy materials, and other products. In a complementary manner, the Specialist manages related assignments, projects, and tasks, and also contributes to the pursuit of private donor funding, fee-for-service opportunities, and public sector grants. The Specialist will be responsible for collaborating with a number of individuals, teams, and partnerships across the organization and in external networks and coalitions.

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Why is gender important for REDD+?

IUCN has produced an excellent new video unpacking why women’s resource rights and decision-making need to be taken into account in REDD+ development.

This video was prepared for IUCN with the support of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) via the Gender Equality for Climate Change Opportunities (GECCO) initiative. This video supports a series of six geographically diverse case studies on gender mainstreaming and women’s empowerment through REDD+.


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Gender and Land Statistics: new FAO info-note based on a collaborative work with PIM

Reposted from the Engendering Data blog:

FAO Gender and Land team has recently published a new info-note on the linkages between Gender and Land Statistics.

Land statistics disaggregated by sex are essential to highlighting the disparities in secure land rights between women and men. With that in mind, in 2014 FAO joined forced with the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM) to develop a common framework for producing sex-disaggregated indicators for FAO’s Gender and Land Rights Database (GLRD). As a result of this work, five indicators were developed. The new info-note provides an overview of the indicators, methodology behind them, and the key concepts that they capture.

FAO’s Gender and Land Rights Database (GLRD) launched its new and improved website in 2015 aiming to increase awareness about gender and land issues around the globe. PIM has been proud to be one of the partners of this initiative, especially because the new GLRD’s indicators of men’s and women’s control over land draw from those proposed in the PIM paper by Doss et al (2013), “Gender Inequalities in Ownership and Control of Land in Africa: Myth versus Reality”.

Read more on this topic in earlier blogs:

FAO’s Gender and Land Rights Database launches a new website

How sex-disaggregated land statistics can help monitor progress of the new Sustainable Development Goals (by Ana Paula de la O Campos (FAO))

Related publications:

Ana Paula de la O Campos, Nynne Warring, Chiara Brunelli, Cheryl Doss, and Caitlin Kieran. 2015. Gender and Land Statistics: Recent developments in FAO’s Gender and Land Rights Database. FAO/PIM Technical Note (pdf)


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IFPRI Gender Methods Seminar: Good practices and lessons learned on gender and collective lands

Resource Equity with Landesa

Presentation by Elisa Scalise and Renee Giovarelli, Co-founders of Resource Equity

Chair: Agnes Quisumbing, Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI Poverty, Health, and Nutrition Division

Discussant: Ruth Meinzen-Dick, Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI Environment and Production Technology Division

Monday, March 14, 2016, 12:00pm-1:00pm

Please find instructions for joining virtually at the end of this message.

Synopsis of the presentation:

Global awareness of two land tenure issues–the importance of recognizing and promoting land rights for women and the problem of insecure collective land and resource tenure rights–is rising. The importance of managing collectively held land, both for those who use it and for the environment, has grown increasingly clear. In fact, studies have estimated that as much as 65 percent of the world’s land is held under collective tenure—customary, community-based tenure systems. Securing that tenure is important for protecting the rights of those communities, and has been shown to improve resource management.

However, efforts to secure community land tenure, generally through documenting and registering rights, are still new. In particular, to date, the conversation around securing collective rights to land has paid little attention to women’s rights, and the effects of formalizing the rights of the collective on women are not well studied. Focusing on securing collective land and resource rights without considering gender differences within communities has the potential to severely disadvantage women who are very often socially, economically, and politically excluded.

This report on gender issues and best practices in collective land tenure projects seeks to begin filling this gap, by taking a detailed look at how six collective tenure land projects addressed gender differences. The six case studies include projects in China, Ghana, India, Kyrgyzstan, Namibia, and Peru. The case studies are program assessments focusing primarily on how each project approached gender, what the gender-differentiated impacts have been in terms of project participation and benefits, and what lessons can be learned and best practices can be drawn from these projects.

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Making sense of land, statistics, and gender

Making sense of land, statistics, and gender (pdf) is a new infographic from the Gender and Land Rights database (GLRD) of the FAO and the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM). The infographic explores the correct use of land ownership statistics (ownership understood in a broad sense beyond individual property rights) and highlights how gender can influence land rights.

The infographic invites viewers to travel to a rural community in Sub-Saharan Africa to meet Tafadzwa, Wema, and Chimango who tell us about their landownership. Despite our hosts being part of the same extended family and contributing to the family farm, the data collected about them differ greatly as a result of their relationships to each other and to agricultural land.

Read on at the original posting on the FAO site.


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Landesa hiring Senior Research and Evaluation Specialist

Landesa is hiring for a Senior Research and Evaluation Specialist. This is an exciting time for those of us working on land rights – a sector in which the challenges to be addressed continue to be enormous and the opportunities to contribute expand by the day.

You can find detailed information at: http://www.landesa.org/jobs/senior-research-and-evaluation-specialist/  and may also contact my colleague, Karina Kloos (karinak@landesa.org) for any questions.