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Bearing the fruit of action: Gender-responsive participatory research and collective management of Native Fruit Trees

Participants create a Resource Map, showing the natural features of their landscape. Photo by Srinivas

A new post by Narasimha Hegde of LIFE Trust, Hugo A. H. Lamers of Bioversity International, and Marlene Elias of Bioversity International on the Landscapes for People, Food, and Nature blog discusses gender-responsive participatory action research methods for the sustainable management of native fruit trees.

Identifying knowledge differences between men and women from different socio-religious and cultural groups, and subsequently providing exposure on value chains and product development for NFTs were critical steps that led to positive changes in livelihoods, gender equality and social inclusion, and forest genetic resource management. The research process started with participatory exercises to understand, share and learn from the men and women in the village about their knowledge of native fruit trees.

Read the post here.

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Publication: Gender and sustainable forest management in East Africa and Latin America

Mwangi, E., R. Meinzen-Dick, and Y. Sun. 2011. Gender and sustainable forest management in East Africa and Latin America. Ecology and Society 16(1): 17.
http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol16/iss1/art17


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Publication: Natural Resource Management– The Impact of Gender and Social Issues (IDRC).

PUBLICATION: Natural Resource Management: The Impact of Gender and Social Issues (IDRC). This book reveals how innovation in natural resource management can contribute to rural poverty reduction. Drawing from research throughout eastern and southern Africa, the contributing authors present a synthesis of lesson from both policy and practice.


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Publication: Natural Resource Managment :The Impact of Gender and Social Issues

This book reveals how innovation in natural resource management can contribute to rural poverty reduction. Drawing from research throughout eastern and southern Africa, the contributing authors present a synthesis of lesson from both policy and practice. They look at various multi-stakeholder more…


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Publication: Access to Water, Women’s Work and Child Outcomes

Authors: Gayatri Koolwal& Dominique van de Walle

World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 5302

Summary: Poor rural women in the developing world spend considerable time collecting water. How then do they respond to improved access to water infrastructure? Does it increase their participation in income earning market-based activities? Does it improve the health and education outcomes of their children? To help address these questions, a new approach for dealing with the endogeneity of infrastructure placement in cross-sectional surveys is proposed and implemented using data for nine developing countries. The paper does not find that access to water comes with greater off-farm work for women, although in countries where substantial gender gaps in schooling exist, both boys’ and girls’ enrollments improve with better access to water. There are also some signs of impacts on child health as measured by anthropometric z-scores.

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News: Farming Butterflies Puts Food on the Table

By Ntandoyenkosi Ncube (IPS Genderwire)

KAKAMEGA FOREST, Kenya, Apr 24, 2010 (IPS) – For 10 years, Roselyne Shikami, sold boiled eggs at the bus station just outside the densely wooded Kakamega Forest in western Kenya, near the border with Uganda. Now she is selling butterflies.

“It was very difficult for me to sell two dozen boiled eggs a day,” the 35-year old told IPS. “Sometimes I sat there for more than eleven hours. But I rarely raised 200 Kenyan shillings (about US$2.60). Now with only two butterflies I can fetch much more.”

Shikami is one of a small group comprised mainly of women, who have started farming butterflies for sale in Kenya and the rest of Africa. They hope to gain customers in Europe and North America, the two most lucrative butterfly markets. Her husband, Joel, is part of the group. Like many others living around the Kakamega forest, he used to earn his income by cutting trees in the forest to sell as firewood.

According to Kakamega Environmental Education Programme (KEEP), a conservation group that trains women in butterfly farming, Kakamega forest has been reduced from over 240,000 hectares in 1820 to only 23,000 hectares today. The forest is generally considered the eastern-most remnant of the lowland Congolean rainforest of Central Africa. The extensive deforestation has largely been due to population growth and unemployment resulting in land clearance for farming and burning of wood for charcoal for domestic use and for sale.

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Publications: Gender and Development Issue on WATER

“The use of water – including the question of who can have access, when, and how much they can have – is shaped as much by the way a society is organised, as by issues of supply. Gender inequality means that women – along with other marginalised groups – are often negatively affected by systems of water allocation, and usually lack the power to take a role in decision-making about which use of water takes priority. This collection of cutting edge articles show, in the vast majority of societies women bare the main responsibility for ensuring adequate water for domestic uses but rarely have a voice in deciding where new water resources should be located and examine the impact that ensuring this domestic supply has on women.”

To see the journal and articles