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Special issue of Agri-Gender: The Journal of Gender, Agriculture, and Food Security

Special Issue on Gender and Policies, Markets and Institutions

Editors: Jemimah Njuki and Cheryl Doss

The Journal of Gender, Agriculture and Food Security (Agri-Gender) is an international, open access, peer-reviewed and refereed journal published by the Africa Centre for Gender, Social Research and Impact Assessment. The main objective of Agri-Gender is to provide an intellectual platform for international scholars to publish their research work on gender, agriculture and food security. The journal aims to promote interdisciplinary research related to gender and the agricultural and food sciences.

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Gender and Development: Special Issue on Inequalities

The Gender & Development Special Issue on Inequalities has been published. The articles in this issue of G&D, co-edited with Naila Kabeer, come from a wide range of voices in international development research, policy and practice, and offer a gendered perspective on inequalities. To subscribe to all content from the journal, you can also click here.


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Does Uganda sufficiently address gender inequalities in climate policies? (via CCAFS)

The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) together with partners International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), recently released an Info Note analyzing Uganda’s climate and development policies from a gender perspective. Feel free to explore the following resources:

Download Info Note: Gender and Climate Change in Uganda: Effects of Policy and Institutional Frameworks
Read accompanying blog: Does Uganda sufficiently address gender inequalities in climate policies?


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New FAO publication: Running out of time: The Reduction of women’s work burden in agricultural production

fao running out of time

Abstract:

Based on a broad literature review, this publication discusses rural women’s time poverty in agriculture, elaborates on its possible causes and implications and provides insight into the various types of constraints that affect the adoption of solutions for reducing work burden. This paper raises questions about the adequacy of women’s access to technologies, services and infrastructure and about the control women have over their time, given their major contributions to agriculture. It also looks into the available labour-saving technologies, practices and services that can support women to better address the demands derived from the domestic and productive spheres and improve their well-being. The reader is presented with an overview of successfully-tested technologies, services and resource management practices in the context of water, energy, information and communication. The findings elaborated in this paper feed a set of recommendations provided for policy makers and development partners. A gender-transformative approach at community and household level is suggested as a way forward to promote women’s increased control over the allocation of their time.

Read the report here.


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Publication: Transnational Land Deals and Gender Equality: Utilitarian and Human Rights Approaches

This article by Poul Wosberg, published in Feminist Economics, is freely available from Routledge Social Sciences journals until June 30, 2015: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13545701.2013.862341#.VNt2_8msyuw

Abstract:

Transnational land deals pose vexing normative (ethical) questions, not least concerning gendered participation and outcomes. This article explores utilitarian and human rights approaches to gender equality in selected policy initiatives on the land deals. While global policy literature manifests growing attention to women in agriculture, the review found the analysis of gender in early policy initiatives to be absent or weak. Utilitarian arguments were used to justify deals but rarely presented women’s participation as a means of social progress or so-called smart economics. Human rights documents were more likely to be critical of the deals and to mention gender, though with little elaboration. While to some extent amended by the emphasis on gender equality in the 2012 Voluntary Guidelines on tenure governance, failures to mobilize the feminist potential in utilitarian and human rights approaches call for more proactive gender analysis and advocacy when addressing transnational land deals as gendered power struggles.

Other key publications from Routledge Social Sciences journals can be accessed here.