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BLOG: We don’t know how many women own land. Why?

by Cheryl Doss, Yale University
Tuesday, 17 May 2016 16:00 GMT

We know women’s legal rights to own, inherit and farm land are crucial. So why is it still so hard to know how many women have rights? The importance of women’s rights to land and property are increasingly being recognized – both as human rights and as fundamental building blocks for economic development.

However the promotion of women’s access to land is hampered by the fact that there are no systematically collected data on women’s land rights or access to land.

This gap in understanding was highlighted during construction of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which call for indicators of women’s secure land tenure and women’s legal rights to land.

Better data would not only be valuable to clarify the extent of gender inequality in land holdings but also to help lay to rest the widely used but unsubstantiated claim that women own only one or two percent of the world’s land.

Better data can also support the monitoring of programs and policies designed to strengthen women’s rights to property and help to ensure that policies without a gender focus do not, in fact, end up weakening or violating women’s property rights.

So what data is needed and how can we obtain it?

Read the rest of the post on Thomson Reuters Foundation News.

 


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EMPLOYMENT: Gender Land Tenure Specialist (Landesa)

Gender Land Tenure Specialist (Mid Level)

Position Title:            Gender Land Tenure Specialist (Mid Level)

Status:                        Regular, Full Time

Location:                    Seattle or Washington DC

Classification:           Exempt (Not Eligible for Overtime Pay)

Date:                           May 2016

Job Summary:  Within a variety of country contexts, the Gender and Land Tenure Specialist provides policy, analytical and program implementation expertise on women’s land rights, including access to property and inheritance, rural land tenure security, access to land, land rights formalization, land markets, land administration and management, and resolution of land and related disputes with a focus on impacts on women and their families. The Specialist will provide technical inputs related to women’s rights and gender; support integrating gender expertise across programs and projects; and participate in global advocacy efforts around women’s land rights, including linking land rights to other human rights and related fields such as gender-based violence, health, food security, agricultural productivity and natural resource management, and climate change.

The Specialist conducts gender-based analyses (both from the desk and in the field), drafts research and briefing papers, advisory memos, training modules, presentations, advocacy materials, and other products. In a complementary manner, the Specialist manages related assignments, projects, and tasks, and also contributes to the pursuit of private donor funding, fee-for-service opportunities, and public sector grants. The Specialist will be responsible for collaborating with a number of individuals, teams, and partnerships across the organization and in external networks and coalitions.

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Making sense of land, statistics, and gender

Making sense of land, statistics, and gender (pdf) is a new infographic from the Gender and Land Rights database (GLRD) of the FAO and the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM). The infographic explores the correct use of land ownership statistics (ownership understood in a broad sense beyond individual property rights) and highlights how gender can influence land rights.

The infographic invites viewers to travel to a rural community in Sub-Saharan Africa to meet Tafadzwa, Wema, and Chimango who tell us about their landownership. Despite our hosts being part of the same extended family and contributing to the family farm, the data collected about them differ greatly as a result of their relationships to each other and to agricultural land.

Read on at the original posting on the FAO site.


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Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Supporting Women’s Land Rights

From 25 January to 5 February, the Land Portal Foundation will be holding a debate on the Global Land Tool Network’s Gender Evaluation Criteria (GEC), which were created to assess the effectiveness of land tools in supporting women’s land rights. The discussion will focus on sharing best practices and lessons learned for supporting women’s land rights.

The debate will take place on the Land Portal in English, French and Spanish, as well as the OECD’s Wikigender platform, and will be facilitated by the International Land Coalition.

For more information or to join this discussion, please click on the link below:


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Women’s Land Rights Visiting Professionals Program

The Landesa Center for Women’s Land Rights and our partner Resource Equity are pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for our Women’s Land Rights Visiting Professionals Program.

Through this program we seek to cultivate a network of qualified professionals from the developing world who are strongly committed to strengthening women’s land rights at local, national, and international levels. Our goal is to boost these visiting professionals’ capacities by fostering cross-cultural connections and enhancing their ability to advocate for and reinforce their commitment to improving women’s land rights.

The program starts with a multiweek (approximately five to six weeks) intensive at Landesa’s headquarters in Seattle, Washington, USA. Because of funding requirements, this year’s class will consist of professionals from India, China, Ghana, Liberia, and Tanzania, and they will join us in September 2016.

We invite you to consider this opportunity and would be very grateful if you could also help us by reaching out to qualified candidates, organizations, and/or networks and forward this information to them.

For more information on the program and application instructions, please visit the Visiting Professionals Program page of Landesa’s website.

If you have any questions, please contact vpp@landesa.org.


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Ask the expert: Dr. Agnes Quisumbing on women’s land rights

The USAID Land Tenure and Property Rights Portal recently interviewed Agnes Quisumbing, Senior Research Fellow at IFPRI, about women’s land rights. Read the interview here.


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What would it really take to strengthen women’s land rights?

The issue of women’s land rights for land restoration will be discussed at a high-level panel “This Land is Our Land: Gender perspectives on tenure and rights” at the Global Landscapes Forum in Paris, December 6.  In preparation for that event, we have asked a number of experts:

“What would it take to strengthen women’s land rights, in practice?”

Follow the debate on the Thrive, the blog of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land, and Ecosystems.